Conditional Luck?

There is noting called «Luck». Or at least given a certain state to start with, there is nothing existing with such a name, since the good things and the bad things come with the same probability for everyone.

One can be lucky or not in very few motives of life, but not for ever. In the time-line of life, events such as when your parents met at first, and when you were the successful sperm are among those only points that we should believe in the role of “luck” in our lives.

Back to the last post, three friends told me that «you are fucking lucky!». Thanks for the notification. If you look at the whole thing the fact that my travel document was finally an «Iranian passport after 1979», among a hell of other possibilities doesn’t make me a lucky person. That’s actually one of the worst such documents to carry on the. One could say that in that specific visa case I had at least a kind of “conditional luck”.

October in San Fransisco

Some times it’s exciting if you don’t know where you will be the next week. This time I even passed the 90th minute. I was lucky that finally it worked!

Exactly one week ago on Tuesday, I was interviewed by US embassy in Oslo. And now, in less than one week, I was informed that my US non-immigrant visa has been issued (perhaps some days ago!), and my stamped passport is on the way back home! It’s really a short time for such a travel document. This poor one, is an Iranian passport with a big sign of “Allah” – standing for the Islamic Republic – and nowadays is not a very useful thing to carry in the western lands. Mine was especially virgin and unexperienced with US, cause this was the first time that it wanted to have a US visa hologram on its face.

Well, being aware that I was really really late to apply for such a permit, I think I was absolutely lucky, finally, to get it. Of course, the officers in Oslo tried their best to speed up the process. Thanks to them. God bless America. And meanwhile God please don’t forget doing the same good job for Iran!

Playing with numbers

Mr. Crab, argues that:

It is hard to believe that a country with the total area of 20,000 km and the population of only 7 millions can stand against a country [Iran] which is at least 80 times bigger than its size and has a generation which by no means can be compared with his indolent young generation.

So, I would be happy to see why while playing with the numbers, Mr. Crab realized that the young Israeli generation becomes indolent. So, let’s try some other numbers:

You might have heard this famous comparison. There are 117 namely Muslims per each Jew. Jews have received, by 2006, 178 Nobel prizes. Multiplying these two recent bold numbers one creature from Mars may expect the Muslim countries to have a little bit more than 20,000 Nobel Prize winners. How much do they have? It is reported between 7 to 12, depending on if you can count someone like Albert Camus as Muslim or not! So, the new generation of such a people has changed immediately and they are not updated by this yet?

What this extraordinary amount of contribution in the science can tell us? Ferdowsi (the Persian poet) has given the answer one millennium ago: knowledge is the power.

Where the hell is such a knowledge coming from? For us young generation of Iranians one of the main sources is the untruthful historical books that we have been obliged to pass since 1980s. Looking back in to the history, I think that Iranian and Jewish people have always been good allies for each other. They owe Cyrus who releases them and they know it. I’ve heard it several times from few Jewish people I have met, although none were citizens of Israel.

In my opinion being enemy of Israel for us Iranian people was a historical lie. And we don’t have enough information to judge about the conflict based on the biased advertisement of the government since our childhood, which aimed primarily to export the Islamic revolution to our neighbors.

3D Pasargadae

The picture on top is an autosteregram I made twelve years ago and I recently used for the Project 300.

This 3D “magic eye” pic is the tomb of Cyrus the great (576 BC – December 530 BC), founder of Achaemenid empire in Persia,  who is also known to have written the first deceleration of human rights 25 centuries ago.

Can you see the three dimensional tomb (called Pasargadae) hidden behind the cuneiform texture on the top picture? It is recommended to try the picture in higher resolution by clicking on the top pic. The black and white image at the bottom is the key.

Tomb of Cyrus the Great

In case you are not familiar with magic eye techniques (autostereograms), these are pictures that can give you a visual illusion of a 3D sculpture from a 2D pictures if you know how to look at them. You should try to change the angle by which your eyes focus on the image. Position your eyes as you are looking at an object behind the screen. Enjoy!

p.s. Here is the book I wrote back then in Persian, plus its software Jarf-Negar. It’s unfortunately under DOS as it was before the release of Windows 95. It was, as far as I remember, the best graphic DOS could ever afford: “Super” VGA, 1024X768 pixels with only 16 colors (selected palette)!